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City of Bloomington, Indiana

University Courts boasts Bloomington's only true Prairie style house as well as an outstanding example of a Mission style bungalow.

Canopied by mature trees, drawn together by Bloomington's only brick streets and bounded by limestone and brick walls, University Courts is the city's most comprehensive historic environment. A stroll through the neighborhood recalls the ambience of the 1920's and 30's.

The neighborhood also illustrates Bloomington's earliest apartment and mixed housing development and, for this reason, is unusual among Bloomington's historic districts. There are twins (duplexes) and flats as well as housing designed around a central courtyard. All of these concepts were a reflection of Bloomington's rapid urbanization and the growth of the university. Because University Courts was built to attract university professionals, the houses are substantial and constructed of brick, limestone, slate and clay tile. Several of the designs were created by John Nichols, Bloomington's first architect.

All of the houses are one-of-a-kind in contrast to working-class neighborhoods like McDoel and the Near West Side. University Courts boasts Bloomington's only true Prairie style house as well as an outstanding example of a Mission style bungalow.

The neighborhood was also home to many famous local industrialists like the Johnson Brothers who co-owned the local creamery and William Hoadley, the stone company owner.

University history is just as rich. Stith Thompson, eminent folklorist, lived on Fess along with William Book, a psychologist, and Beatrice Geiger, long time chair of the Home Economics Department.